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Sukuk: A Global Economic Model

On 5 March 2009, the Vatican’s official newspaper L’Osservatore Romano reported that banks should look at the rules of Islamic finance to restore confidence amongst their clients at a time of global economic crisis. Author Loretta Napoleoni and income strategist, Claudia Segre, said that “The ethical principles on which Islamic finance is based may bring […]

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Nigeria’s Followership Problem

We’ve had many essays that addressed leadership problems in Nigeria. Many columnists have posited that the only way out of the quagmire Nigeria’s in is to push for leaders that have ideas and that can make things happen. Where most of these arguments fail is that they do not make it clear that as important […]

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Corruption Between Nigerians And The People Of Lot

Josephine Agwu is a cleaner who works at the Murtala Muhammed airport in Lagos. At sighting a cash of $12,000 within the airport, all that comes to her mind was, “this is not mine, I must return it to the authority.” She did exactly what her mind told her and what followed her action was […]

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The Psychology of Settling

When you study the history of electioneering in Nigeria since 2003, you will discover that there is a recurring trend. That trend is called “settling”. In the Nigerian Presidential election of 2003, Gani Fawehinmi was one of the Presidential aspirants. He was a man who people loved and who had a great record when it […]

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Dissecting The 2013 Egypt Coup and Turkey Failed Coup

Friday in the Muslim world is a very sacrosanct day that affords the faithful opportunity to congregate and share thoughts. As for the Friday 15th of July, 2016 it was indeed a dark one as some elements within the Turkish military forces planned to topple the democratically elected government in the country. The reality was […]

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Ending The Cycle of Madness: Reexamining The Third Option

I voted President Buhari in the last election. But no, it wasn’t because I thought he could change anything; I have never seen him as anything but a living and breathing disaster. I voted for him because I overrated the ability of Nigerians to think and reason correctly. My thought was that if President Buhari […]

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Redefining Mo Ibrahim’s Prize For African Leaders

The Mo Ibrahim’s prize for achievement in African leadership was announced few weeks ago and for the umpteenth time there was no clear cut winner for the coveted prize among past African leaders. After reading the news, I remembered a discussion with a colleague at work recently on the personality of Mo himself and how […]

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Hijab, CAN and Religious Tolerance in Nigeria (2)

Obviously, the position of CAN which premised education as a sole property of missionaries requires rigorous review. The colonial authorities used education as a tool in administration towards integrating their culture and religious belief to respective countries they colonize. Yet the education and civilization promoted by the colonial masters were largely inherited from Islamic Civilization […]

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Hijab, CAN and Religious Tolerance in Nigeria (1)

On September 11, 2003, two teachers at the Franklin Science Academy in Muskogee, Oklahoma, were discussing the terrorist attacks that had occurred exactly two years earlier, when they spotted a sixth grader, Nashala Hearn, wearing a Muslim headscarf. The school’s dress code prohibited students from wearing “hats, caps, bandanas, plastic caps, or hoods on jackets […]

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Like Every Other Month, This June Shall Pass

It is the middle of the year and also the last month in the second quarter of 2016. Thus, the month provides us with the opportunity to reviewing our achievements so far in the ongoing year in order to know where we are when compared to where we are coming from since the start of […]

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Before We Cast The First Stone On A Kidnapper

The Nigerian Senate has been shrouded in controversies of late which has resorted to Nigerians believing that nothing good can come out of the hallowed chamber. From the purported purchase of SUV jeeps at an over-bloated price, to the proposed amendment, and hitherto stoppage of the CCT, CCB and ACJ Acts, and to the handling […]

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The Struggle between National Interest and Ethnicised Politics

In Nigeria, at convocation of every national discourse, at every agitation of causes for national growth and development, ethnicised politics is always a default virus. It corrupts the reasoning of the citizenry; it diverts attention from core issues of national interest to mundanities and banalities; it changes the supposed narrative of pan-Nigeria conversation to one […]

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#PANAMAPAPERS: A WAKE UP CALL

We campaign and walk the streets, we carry placards in the scorching sun chanting “we want an end to inequality” The truth is our forefathers were victims of inequality, we are victims of inequality, and if care is not taken, generations to come will be victims, but why? Because we have never been equal to […]

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The Laxity of a State

The recent I don’t care attitude of governments at all levels in Nigeria drew my attention to an incident that occurred when growing up. News had it then that a cabinet member of a state had lost his family members to a car crash due to bad condition of roads within the state. That was […]

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A Review of Dambisa Moyo’s Dead Aid, by Semiu A. Akanmu

Aid, “a sum total of both concessional loans and grants”, from donors – mainly Western, to African countries has “hampered, stifled and retarded Africa’s development” is the thesis of Dambisa’s Dead Aid.  It is a tightly-argued book, combative, deep, factual, and above all, problem-solving. Dead Aid – a 187-page, 2-part, and 10-chapter book – is […]

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Hustling for Survival 

Here are two boys. No! They are men, young men; local artisanal fishermen on fishing expedition. They are hardworking Nigerians, not criminals, in disagreement to the demeaning declaration by the President of their Nation. Photographed at the Lagoon Front Resort, located at the tail end of the ‘University of Lagos’ Campus, Akoka, Lagos, Nigeria. To […]

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A ki je meji po, l’aba Alade: Re-understanding Yoruba Philosophical Thought on Scarcity and Resource Allocation

Eunice, Precious and Taofeeq are friends whose certain challenges in life endeavours –what my other spiritual friends will call trials –propelled the need to re-understand “A ki je meji po, l’aba Alade” Yoruba philosophical thought. Eunice and Precious’ cases are similar, though with different causative factors. Taofeeq’s was quite different. But all are unified at […]

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“It is up to you”: My First Lesson on Plurality in Malaysia

From certain distant observers, Malaysia is an Islamic country, most likely, the nationals speak Arabic, and Sharee’a (Islamic) law is the national legal mechanism. No matter how ludicrous this assertion might sound to those in the knowledge of the actual identity of Malaysia, it should not be surprising.  It cannot be unusual when there are […]

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Show Me Your Pineapple

The pineapple is quite intriguing, an appetising and nutrient-loaded fruit. In every way, the pineapple is unique – from its rugged pine skin to its ‘crown’ and its delicious ‘flesh’. Food experts call it the most nutritious fruit in the world. It is described as “… a composite of many flowers whose individual fruitlets fuse […]

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Watch How Nigeria’s Buhari Militarizes Civilian Populace

Emerging trends from Nigeria, Africa’s largest economy, have started worrying investors about the possible resumption of full-fledged violence in the country due to Buhari’s authorization of undemocratic trends among the military towards civilian population.  It will be recalled that previous administrations, beginning from the late Ya’radua and continuing into Jonathan, had made frantic efforts to […]

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Metering Black Lives: Making MarShawn McCarrel Matter

When, actually if, McCarrel had voluntarily arrived the steps of Ohio Statehouse it did not occur to his activist colleagues and critics that that was his last outing in public and private.  According to posts on McCarrel’s Facebook page it appeared that some “demons” were upping their game in attacking the Black Lives Matter struggle organizer, […]

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What make a brand success?

The European languages are members of the same family. Their separate existence is a myth. The languages only differ in their grammar, their pronunciation and their.

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